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 Home >> Korean Cuisine >> Agujjim (Steamed Goosefish soup)

'Agujjim' or 'Hot and Spicy Steamed Goosefish'


Koreans enjoy various kinds of food.   One of the most popular is steamed fish also called in Korean, 'Jjim'.   Most Koreans love the hot and spicy taste of this particular dish.   

Agujjim is one of the most popular 'Jjim' dishes in Korea.   To make this food, a fish called Agu, is dried in clear air for 15 days.   After that time, it is steamed with Korean soybean paste and powdered hot pepper.   To add some more special taste, bean sprouts and parsley can be added.   The original name of this food is 'Aguijjim'.   

According to Buddhist culture, 'Agui' is the place where greedy people are believed to be born in their next life.   This place symbolizes hunger, thirst and pain.
Haven't you ever come across this species?   Well, you cannot miss it.... The Agui fish has the most enormous head and mouth and no scale, and was so named because of its omnivorous attitude.

Until the 1940's, Agu was ignored by fishermen because of its appearance.   However, as fish became scarcer, Agu became a very highly rated fish, coming at a higher price even than beef itself.   Because it likes to eat yellow Corvine, flat fish, eel, shrimp and other sea food rich in protein, Agu does contain a lot of proteins too and is therefore very tasty.

When talking about 'Agujjim', the word 'Masan' usually comes before it.   That is because this particular cuisine is believed to have been first created in Masan, Gyeongsangnam-do Province.   Koreans eat Agujjim with rice, and it also goes down very well with liquors.   Try mixing Korean cuisine's hot taste with a glass of Soju and you will get a feel for Korea.

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